Drew Barnard

Drew Barnard is a musician, writer, and a lover of good conversation. He believes that a pursuit of God should lead to a whole-hearted engagement of the mind and emotions. Raised in a Christian home, Drew watched his parents move into the Anabaptist circles at a young age. After his father left the family when he was sixteen, Drew faced many questions about his purpose in life and learning how to discern God’s will. As a result of these experiences, he is passionate about seeing others faithfully serving Christ, regardless of trying circumstances. He is particularly interested in the questions and difficulties that exist within the Anabaptist communities.

A classical pianist, Drew recently quit his office job to become a music teacher; he has a number of private piano students and also serves as the music director at Schaefferstown Mennonite High School. In his free time, if he’s not reading, writing, or playing piano, Drew loves spending time with his siblings or catching up one-on-one with his friends. He attends the Church at Cross Keys and is excited to see other brothers and sisters hungry to serve God more fully.

As an editor and contributor at Think Truth, Drew plans to continue using this platform to produce content inspired by rousing discussions with friends, personal study, and ultimately an ever-growing love for Jesus.

Posts By Drew Barnard:

Giving Thanks Through Grief

We’re nearing the end of the year. And today we briefly step away from the usual grind to celebrate Thanksgiving with our family and friends. As we look forward to good food, holiday traditions, and relaxed times of fellowship, it’s easy to feel thankful for life and God’s blessings. We … Read More

The Importance of Having Difficult Conversations

We often struggle to communicate as deeply as we’d like. But this difficulty is especially pronounced when it comes to having hard conversations. When disagreements happen, it’s tempting to run away. Then the next time we’ll foolishly charge into the situation, hurting relationships and just making things worse. Peacefully handling … Read More

Combating False Simplicity

I just wrote a post where I argued that we make life too complicated. We allow ourselves to get bogged down in vague doubt instead of doing what we know to do. But we also have a problem with clinging to simplistic narratives. Sometimes our Christian rhetoric starts to seem … Read More

On the Simplicity of Doing

I’ve been struck by something lately. I often hear someone talk about something they know they shouldn’t be doing, rather sheepishly. Or maybe it’s something they should be doing but aren’t. What’s striking is that often the solution really isn’t that complex. It’s clear which path is right. But somehow … Read More

The Selfie Problem

We don’t view ourselves the same way any more. Or, to put it another way, we view ourselves a lot more. Our lives have been changed by our phones and how easy it is to take pictures and send them anywhere. This makes us much more aware of how we … Read More

Always Together, Halfway

There’s a frightening irony about our modern lives: as we become increasingly interconnected with others, we risk succumbing to loneliness. This is tragic, because we have more tools at our disposal, not less. That’s the problem, though: we can use good tools at the wrong time and forfeit opportunities for … Read More